Proofreading

Even in an age of texting and abbreviated emails, immaculate grammar and syntax continues to be a given for any business determined to present its best face to the world.

Apropriate, contextual & properly chosen

And, as experienced business people acknowledge, first impressions, especially when it comes to the written word, are apt to last. Without being conscious of it, we form a negative impression of a business delivering its message with sloppy grammar.

Who can honestly say they are unperturbed when they encounter a website, an awards submission, a tender document, a speech or a news release which is a grammatical or syntactical mess: confused cases, use of the singular mixed-up with the plural, inappropriate usages, unexplained acronyms and indiscriminate use of capitals where lower case would be more correct?

As wordsmiths, our role is to ensure that each word that emerges on behalf of our customers is the right one: appropriate, in context and properly chosen.We regularly review customers’ copy, whether for a tender, an awards’ submissions or a pitch document, to make sure the words are right and that their overall effect is cool, crisp and professional.

This makes an impact: when there is little to separate competing parties in skill and competence, correctly presented content can make all the difference between winning and being an also-ran. Failure to pay sufficient attention to spelling, syntax – the arrangement of words and phrases to create well-formed sentences – and the generally accepted rules of grammar is to cut the legs from all the effort and experience that has gone into producing your document.

Decision-makers may lack in-depth knowledge of English grammar, but they are more than capable of recognising when a document has been poorly produced. And they tend to make their decisions based on their impressions.
At Blueprint Media, our team includes seasoned, high-level professional sub-editors who can make everyone’s copy sing.

So, if you want the Internet’s global audience to read your succinct, sharp, immaculately written presentation, make sure you let us look at it first.

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